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Chappy Fiction’s Time Travel Tales Update!

It’s been a while since I’ve made a formal update on Chappy Fiction’s Time Travel Tales. I’m sorry about that. This has been a busy year for me. I sold an option to Talisman Films and am still very much involved in writing for the project. I’ve also started a new day job, so my days are packed!

First, I’d like to thank everyone who submitted. I read many fantastic stories, and so did my friends and slush readers Nick Tchan, Daniel Shallue, and Lou J Berger. But we can’t publish every story! BTW, these three guys… Fantastic.

So, all contracts are signed, all payments have been made—speaking of, I had this feeling when paying the last author. I’d just received funds in my PayPal account from a short story sale. Something about getting paid for writing, then paying an author for their writing with those same funds is extremely satisfying. Paying writers for their work feels awesome. Using your own writing money to do it… magical? Like when you land play of the game with Hanzo in competitive Overwatch.

Anyways… who are those authors that I paid? And what did I pay them for? Here’s the table of contents.

Auston Habershaw - The Day it All Went Sideways
Martin L Shoemaker - Visits (with a Stranger)
Tony Pi - Dragon Father's Wounds
Stewart Baker - Proceedings from the First and Only Sixteenth Annual One-Woman Symposium on Time Manipulation
H.L. Fullerton - Grandma Was a Time Machine
Desmond Warzel - I Only Time-Travel During School Hours
Brenda Anderson - A Murder of Crows
SL Huang - The Documentarian
K. Kazul Wolf - Come One, Come All
Steve Simpson - Danta in Black
Brian Trent - Omnipunks
Rasheedah Phillips - The Convention
Alter Reiss - If the Stars Reverse their Courses, if the Rivers Run Back from the Sea
David Steffen - A Switch in Time
Catherine Wells -  Into the Desolation
Alisa Alering - Absolute Pony
John Frochio - The Time Traveler's Accountant
Rosemary Claire Smith - Not with a Bang
Robert Silverberg - When We Went to See the End of the World
Sean Williams - A Map of the Mines of Barnath

We’re still on schedule for a release on or before December 1st. In the next month or so, be on the lookout for the cover art reveal! Oh yeah, and I'll be updating the site too. This theme's real shitty.

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Nebulas Nominations are here

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Nebulas Nominations are here

They're here. And I'm pretty damn happy. 

As a reader, gamer, editor, writer and creator I have many different circles. So for some of you, explaining what the Nebulas are is redundant. But for those of you who don’t know, the Nebulas are kind of a big deal. Nebula awards aren’t just the Hugo’s with a different title. They're awards for writers by writers. If you're a film buff, think of the SAG (Screen Actors Guild) awards. You have to be a member of SFWA (Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America) to nominate and vote for Nebula Awards. To be a member, you have to be a SFF industry pro. 

This morning they just announced nominations for this year. See the list here. 

Wow. Last year was a great year for SFF. Here’s what I consider the highlights.

On the lit side we have The Grace of Kings Ken Liu, a short form juggernaut, finally published a novel. It’s on my list to read. I love his short stories.

The Fifth Season, by N.K. Jemisin is the best book that I’ve read that was published in the last five years. That said, I’m behind most of my peers in reading, so much of my time is dedicated to catching up on classics (when I’m not reading submissions or critiquing my pals!). But I read this fresh take on high fantasy late last year. If you played the Dragon Age games, you’ll find some parallels with this book. This is a tale of oppression, prejudice, and dangerous magic. It’s also beautifully crafted.

Today I Am Paul by Martin L. Shoemaker. Am I allowed to talk about this? I’m biased. I get it. Transparency: Martin is a good friend of mine and I read this story before it sold (I read it before it was famous, eat your heart out SFF hipsters!). But if you think that’s going to stop me from telling you to read this story, you’re out of your damn mind.

I’m not pandering. Today I am Paul is mastercraft. It’s sold to a billion year’s best and foreign markets. It’s an android story. It’s a dementia story. As you read it, you know it comes from the heart.  

Today I am Paul is THE android story of the year. And it murders the competition, sorry Ex Machina.

 

My non-writer pals may be more interested in the Outstanding Dramatic Presentation category, so I’ll go into a bit more detail here. Just looking at this list as a whole, I don’t see agendas. I see diversity. And good fiction.

The Martian, Didn’t see it. Yikes! Sorry guys. I wanted to read the book first, because who doesn’t? But then submissions. Option. Work. Don’t worry though, I’ve got stuff to say about the rest.

Star Wars: The Force Awakens, After my first watch, I didn’t know if I loved ep 7 or just liked it. Then I thought about it for about two weeks straight. I loved it. That said, I think they played it a tad safe. Nothing particularly new, other than the cast. Oh, and this time they can really act and they have damn good chemistry. I’m very, very excited to see what Rain Johnson does with it. (He only directed the greatest episode in television history: Ozymandias)

Inside Out, My wife cried while she watched this. I didn’t. Really. I promise. I definitely didn’t. No. Psh. It’s the best Pixar movie since (the first fifteen minutes of) Up. If you haven’t, see Inside Out. Keep some Kleenex at the ready. 

 Jessica Jones, Really worked for me. While the fight scenes left a lot to be desired in comparison to Daredevil (what’s JJ’s super power anyways? Breaking locks? Shoving people?), I thought that the story is only second to Better Call Saul, which isn’t genre. JJ has my vote for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation because this is an award for writers, not special effects teams or story board artists.

My only complaint is the formula. Introducing the big baddie in ep 1 and setting the stage so that you know his defeat won’t happen until the season finale saps quite a lot of tension. They’ve caught The Doctor in episode 4! But you know he’ll give them the slip. I’m currently doing some contract writing work for a TV series, so this is the kind of thing I’m trying to avoid.

Mad Max: Fury Road, Pretty much the exact opposite of JJ. Eh, story. Epic action, sets, world building, artful direction. I hear their screenplay was a storyboard—that would explain a lot. Great, great movie, despite the plot.

Ex Machina, 92% on Tomatoes? It felt fairly derivative. It didn’t have an interesting take on the human condition, androids or the singularity. So I looked to the characters. None of them are particularly compelling, except for the androids. It’s a bottle film and a well acted one, which is essential for what they’re going for.

More interestingly, it’s a $15 million dollar budgeted genre film, a rarity these days. It’s seems Hollywood is shrinking on it’s budget types. We have the Blumhouse slog budget. Take chances on movies, throw whatever into theaters and see what sticks… but each with a low $1 million. Get ADT security cameras to direct your movie (looking at you, found footage films). Spend the rest on advertising. And then the blockbusters like Interstellar with budgets over $150 million.

Not much room left for the medium budget SFF flick. I like to support “the little guy” movies like this.

Budget politics aside, I’d still recommend watching Ex Machina, it’s worth staying awake for almost 2 hours and spending $2/3 at RedBox, Youtube or Amazon.

OR wanna know a better way to spend your time? Read or listen to Martin Shoemaker’s story. It’s free. And it won’t take you 2 hours.

 

 

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Slush Update!

To everyone who submitted, thank you. Your stories have been fantastic. Yes, even the ones I rejected. Yes. Even the form rejections.

 

To everyone who is still awaiting a response, hang tight. I’m a writer too. I just received a contract on a story that I’d had pending for 160 days. I understand the nagging thoughts that pester your mind as you await a response. Did she read it? How many are left that I’m up against? I think I’ll go check Submission Grinder for the hundredth time. I'd tell you to chill, but I know I never can.

 

Here’s the news. Right now every story has been read. It’s going to take a few more weeks for me to decide which stories will make the most diverse and well rounded time travel themed anthology for my taste. Stay tuned. If you haven’t heard back from me by this time next month, feel free to query.

 

Oh yeah. Contracts are in order (a few have been sent). Chappy Fiction Inc paper work has been filed. We’re legit.

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Response Times, Voices and Homework

We are up on Submission Grinder!

We’ve been receiving some great submissions. As much as I’d like to keep reading this awesome slush forever, I’m updating the submission page to say we’re closing submissions on January 1st because I have some other creative commitments early next year. Because of all these wonderful submissions, we may take a while getting back to you. Query if you haven't heard back from us by February of 2016.

Here’s some more detail on what we need in the anthology: We want a variety of voices and would like to showcase a diverse cast of voices and ideas involving time travel. We are suckers for genre and sub-genre mashups. Create a unique voice, combine some sub-genres, have interesting characters and make it all work, we'll fall in love with your story.

Don’t know what to write? Or maybe you have some writer’s block? Here’s some homework that might help you through it. These are a few of my favorite time travel short stories:

Needle in a Timestack and When We Went to See the End of the World by Robert Silverberg. All You Zombies by Heinlein. Respectively you can find them here, here and here.

 

 

 

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To Kickstart or Not

Hey everyone, I’m just doing some house keeping via an update on the anthology and where everything stands.

 

This operation is a humble project. I want to be transparent about that. It will be epublished and printed on demand for the physical copies.

 

About the possible Kickstarter:

 

There are many benefits to running a Kickstater. Funding and exposure for our time travel anthology being the main perks.  However, there are some draw backs. I’ve been contacted by some authors with concerns after hearing that I was doing a Kickstarter. What happens if the Kickstarter doesn’t fund? Are you going to cancel or change your pay rates? There’s definitely a stigma if I run a Kickstarter. If the campaign fails, we don’t want that to stain our image either.

 

The successful kickstarters that I have studied came from well established editors teamed with authors like Scott Lynch. Zombies Need Brains was able to fund $15,000 for their last project. That’s impressive, but I am not sure how realistic it is for our little anthology to fund like that.

 

I want to reassure the authors that have been submitting their stories. I’ve already secured an investor for this anthology. My idea for the Kickstarter was to help fund the book. Not fund it entirely. The 6 cent pro rates are solid. That isn’t changing. However, if we decide to run a Kickstarter, the more successful it becomes, the more authors we can include. And possibly, the more we can pay.

 

With all that said, I’m curious what the authors have to say about Kickstarter. Should we run one? Do you see a lot of folks backing our project? If you have an opinion, let me know.

 

On to cooler topics. We need a name. Many have been suggested. I posted on social media and had well over 40 suggestions, some of them serious. Have an idea? Feel free to email us a name or post in the comments. If we choose yours, we’ll email you a free e-copy of the anthology for your contribution!

 

Authors Auston Habershaw and Martin Shoemaker will be our anchor authors for the anthology. They both have great contributions that we can’t wait to share with the world. Auston is the author of The Oldest Trick published by Harper Voyager. Martin is the author of Today I am Paul, a Hugo worthy short if ever I’ve read one.


Thanks for stopping by. I am grateful for your support. Continue to submit! For your time travel fix, check out Tim Napper’s blog on the subject http://www.nappertime.com/time-travel-and-its-discontents/


Or watch Don’t Hug Me I’m Scared Episode 2:

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Time Travel Anthology Call for Submissions

ChappyFiction LLC is now accepting submissions to its new science fiction/fantasy anthology on Time Travel (title pending).

The anthology will contain new short stories centered around time travel. How does it affect our society, our humanity, or the characters? We want new stories. Create paradoxes. Make us laugh. Make us cry. If you have a killer reprint, query us first before submitting.

Length:

We prefer stories under 7,000 words. We will look at stories over that, but the longer the story is, the better it has to be. We want to include many authors, so shorter stories will have the edge.

Format:

We're not picky. However, standard MS format will communicate to us that you're professional. Pink text on a black background will make our eyes bleed. In a bad way. Send over a doc or docx attached to your email. In the body of your email, write a quick, short cover letter. List sales. Don't summarize your story. Put the word count and your contact info somewhere in the cover letter. In the subject line put "Submission: (title of your story)". Send email to chappyfiction at gmail.com. We will close the submission period sometime in January 2016.

UPDATE! We accept multiple submissions.

Payment:

6 cents a word. That's pro rates! Word! Upon acceptance, you'll receive an industry standard contract (6 months exclusivity, with the exception to year's best anthologies).

What not to do:

Do not submit stories that don't contain Time Travel! It'll be a waste of your time and our time. And you'll be black listed from future Chappy Fiction anthologies!

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